Clarendon College, Clarendon, Texas • Division of Liberal Arts
(Fall/Spring) SYLLABUS
Introduction to the Theatre • DRAM 1310.101 (195) (3 hrs)
Lecture time - 11:00 a.m. M-W-F • Instructor: Bill Huey
Spring 2011 • Harned Sisters Fine Arts Center Stage
Office hours/class schedule • 806-874-4838

TEXT REQUIRED: Edwin Wilson and Alvin Goldfarb. Theater: The Lively Art- 6th edition, (Boston: McGraw-Hill College). 2008.
This text is available at the Clarendon College Bookstore
On-Line Learning Center: chapter outlines, objectives, flashcards,
video clips and
practice chapter quizes
http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/007351411x/student_view0/index.html
COURSE CONTENT: To provide the student with the fundamental knowledge of the development of western drama and the theatrical arts.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: To give a working vocabulary of the conventions of theatre so that students may participate in it: To give a greater knowledge of theatre history so that students may understand it: To give practical experience in the theatre so that students may appreciate it: To give the theoretical framework of performance so that students may utilize it.
Methods of Instruction:  Lectures, video/DVD preview, special presentations, individual and group participation and email feedback for lecture and on-line students
Entry Level Competencies for on-line students:  Since this course is taught entirely over the World Wide Web, you should be familiar with how to use a standard Web browser (Firefox, Safari, or Internet Explorer) and electronic mail. Students are expected to be reasonably proficient in written and spoken Standard American English. Familiarity with computers, the Internet, and e-mail are necessary for the best success in this class. Each on-line student must have an activated e-mail account and must send an introduction e-mail to billhuey@theatre-arts.net during the first week of class so that I can identify your e-mail address.

Preferred method of communication with on-line students: email, skype or discussion board

On-line and Lecture Student-to-Instructor Web video calling available.
Live Chat through computer keyboard, video/audio calls with web cam

download application | Skype 2.7 for Mac | Skype 3.8 for Windows |
How to make free video calls | Skype me | Bill Huey |
This table/calendar is a guideline. You should be able to read the text,
take unit tests, and complete all written assignments in 12-14 weeks.

Guide
Course Outline/Reading timetable
Tests and Papers

Unit One
Audience & Critic (Ch 4) Acting (Ch 5)
1st Essay-deadline -1st essay - Feb 2
Playwright (Ch 6) Dramatic genres (Ch 7)
1st Test (ch 4-7) -deadline- Feb 16
Unit Two
Director & Producer (Ch 8) Theatre Spaces (Ch 9)
Designers: Scenery & Costume (Ch 10)
2nd Test (ch 8-11) -deadline- March 9
Designers: Lighting & Sound (Ch 11)
1st Play Review-deadline- March 7
Unit Three
Greek/Roman Theatre (Ch 13) Medieval/Asian Theatre (Ch 14)
Renaissance Theatre (Ch 15)
2nd Essay-deadline- March 30
Restoration through Romanticism (Ch 16)
3rd Test (ch 13-16)-deadline- April 13
Unit Four
Early Modern Movements (Ch 17)
Twentieth Century Diversity (Ch 18)
2nd Play Review-deadline- April 27
Contemporary Trends (Ch 19)
4th Test (ch17-19) -deadline- May 4
Final Week
Final exam on date/ Clarendon College website
No chapter tests/papers accepted May 7-11

Instructions for On-line Course Evaluation

Introduction to Theatre - Exams
Exams : There are four (4) unit tests for this course and all are based on the publisher's chapter quizes.

Exams (for online students) will be available in for
limited times, please keep on track so that you are ready to take each test as posted. All tests should be taken by May 4. NO chapter tests or papers will be accepted May 7-11, 2011.
Unit One
Audience & Critic (Ch 4) Acting (Ch 5)
Playwright (Ch 6) Dramatic genres (Ch 7)
1st Test (ch 4-7) -deadline- Feb 16
Unit Two
Director & Producer (Ch 8) Theatre Spaces (Ch 9)
Designers: Scenery/Costume (Ch 10)Lighting/Sound (Ch 11)
2nd Test (ch 8-11) -deadline- March 9
Unit Three
Greek/Roman Theatre (Ch 13) Medieval/Asian Theatre (Ch 14)
Renaissance Theatre (Ch 15)
Restoration through Romanticism (Ch 16)
3rd Test (ch 13-16) -deadline- April 13
Unit Four
Early Modern Movements (Ch 17)
20th Century Diversity (Ch 18)Contemporary Trends (Ch 19)
4th Test (ch17-19) -deadline- May 4
On-Line Learning Center: practice chapter quizes (review-no credit)
http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/007351411x/student_view0/index.html
Introduction to Theatre Assignments:
1. The student is expected to attend and review two (2) live theatrical play performances during the time allocated for this course. The review should be a minimum of 2 pages, but not more than 4 pages).

Ist Review Due: March 7, 2011
2nd Review Due: April 27, 2011

One-Act-Plays and musical reviews will not be accepted,
you must go to 2 full-length plays, operas or ballets.

HOW TO SUBMIT A PAPER: Each paper (review/essay) should be e-mailed to me at: billhuey@theatre-arts.net as an attachment in MS Word 97-2004 or 2007. Make sure your documents are tagged with doc., docx, or rtf. All papers (review/essay) are due on weeks shown in course calendar, but may be submitted at will if completed early.

Papers will not be accepted after the deadline posted above.

DO NOT send papers as part of your email text
DO NOT send by fax or snail mail.

Include in the review
  1. Your Name, Course # and Date
  2. Play Title and playwright
  3. when you saw the play (date:dd,mm,yr)
  4. where; both town/city and theatre, it was presented
  5. who (college, high school, community theatre, etc.) produced it
  6. History of production (Where/when it was first produced)
  7. and include at least 2 reviews from previous productions of the show(s) you are reviewing).
    Do not write a synopsis of the play.
Build your review around the following questions:
  1. Did I enjoy the show?
  2. Would I recommend it to a friend?
  3. Was the play appropriate for both the actors and the audience?
  4. Was the play worth doing?
  5. What was the playwright trying to say?
  6. Was it well said? • Was it worth saying?
  7. Was the acting convincing?
  8. Did the scenery, lights and costumes help me enjoy or better understand the show?
    These 2 reviews are 20% of your total grade.
Live Theatre Links in the Texas Panhandle.
Clarendon College Theatre-http://www.theatre-arts.net/pages/home.htm
Amarillo Little Theatre- http://www.amarillolittletheatre.org/
Amarillo College Theatre- http://sites.actx.edu/~theatre/season1.htm
West Texas A&M University Theatre, Canyon: - http://www.wtamu.edu/academics/bit-current-season.aspx
Texas Tech Theatre, Lubbock: http://www.depts.ttu.edu/theatreanddance/
Wayland Baptist University Theatre, Plainview: http://www.wbu.edu/news_and_events/2008/september/theatreseason.html
Midwestern State University Theatre, Witchita Falls: http://finearts.mwsu.edu/theatre/index.asp
One Play attendance may be satisfied with
a movie/play compare and contrast essay/review.
View a movie based on a play: look for Shakespeare, Neil Simon, Sam Shepard, Arthur Miller, etc.
Read and write an essay on the play that the movie is based on. (same criteria as play essays below)
Write a compare and contrast review on the treatment of the movie to the play script.

Build your compare and contrast review around the following questions:
  • What does the title mean in relation to the film/play as a whole?
  • How are the opening credits of the film presented? Do they relate to meaning in the play?
  • Why does the film/play start in the way that it does?
  • Are there any motifs (scenes, images) of dialogue which are repeated? What purpose do they serve?
  • Is sound used in any vivid ways either to enhance the film? (i.e. Enhance drama, heighten tension, disorient the viewer, etc.)
  • How does the film use color or light/dark to suggest tone and mood in different scenes?
  • Are there any striking uses of perspective (seeing through a character's eyes, camera angle, etc.) How does this relate to the meaning of the scene in the movie/play?
  • What specific scene constitutes the film's/play's climax? How does this scene resolve the central issue of the film/play?
  • Does the film/play leave any disunities (loose ends) at the end? If so, what does it suggest?
  • Why does the film/play conclude on a particular image?
2. Read plays assigned and write two short essays (2 to 3 pages)
  1. read and write your first essay on Tartuffe, by Moliere,
    or She Stoops to Conquer by Oliver Goldsmith
    Ist Essay Due: Feb 2, 2011
  2. read and write your second essay on Pygmalion by G. B. Shaw,
    or The Master Builder by Henrik Ibsen.
    2nd Essay Due: March 30, 2011

These essays are 20% of your total grade.

Include in your essays, answers to the following questions.

  1. Your Name, Course #, Date
  2. Name of play read
  3. What was the writer attempting to say?
  4. What mood did the play create?
  5. What was your feeling at the end of the script?
  6. Which scene stood out most clearly?
  7. Which character was most memorable?
  8. Which characters, if any, were difficult to understand?
  9. If you were directing this script for the stage, who would you cast in the two major roles?
  10. Do you think this play would attract an audience in your community?
    Do not write a synopsis of the play.
HOW TO SUBMIT A PAPER: Each paper (review/essay) should be e-mailed to me at: billhuey@theatre-arts.net as an attachment in MS Word 97-2004 or 2007. Make sure your documents are tagged with doc., docx, or rtf. All papers (review/essay) are due on weeks shown in course calendar, but may be submitted at will if completed early.
Papers will not be accepted after the deadline posted above.
DO NOT send papers as part of your email text; DO NOT send by fax or snail-mail.
Grades are based on:
Tests 60 % 2 Play Reviews 20 % 2 Drama Essays 20 %
This course meets requirements for core curriculum degree planning and is designed for transfer credit.

Academic Honesty: Cheating or plagiarizing on assignments or exams will not be tolerated.
Such conduct will result in the student being dropped from the class with a F.

Exemplary Educational Objectives
To demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts.
To understand those works as expressions of individual & human values within an historical/social context.
To respond critically to works in the arts.
To engage creative process & understand the physical & intellectual demands required of the artist.
To articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts.
To develop an appreciation for the aesthetic principles that guide or govern the arts.
To demonstrate knowledge of the influence of the arts or interculteral experiences.
WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURE: A student who drops a course after the first 12 class days of instruction will receive a grade of “W.” No classes may be dropped after the 12th week of a fall or spring semester or the 5th week of a summer term. To drop a class, the student must obtain the written consent of the instructor. Drop forms are available in the Student Services Office.
CLASSROOM CONDUCT: Failure to comply with lawful direction of a classroom instructor is a disruption for all students enrolled in the class. Cheating violations include, but are not limited to: (1) obtaining an examination by stealing or collusion; (2) discovering the content of an examination before it is given; (3) using an unauthorized source of information during an examination; (4) entering an office or building to obtain unfair advantage; (5) taking an examination for another person; (6) altering grade records; (7) plagiarism. Plagiarism is the using, stating, offering or reporting as one’s own, an idea, expression, or production of another person without proper credit.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT STATEMENT:  It is the policy of Clarendon College to provide reasonable and appropriate accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities.  This college will adhere to all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and guidelines with respect to providing reasonable accommodations as required to afford equal educational opportunity.  It is the student's responsibility to contact the student services office in a timely manner if he/she desires to arrange for accommodations.
revised 08.Dec.10